Piedmont Interventional Pain Care, PA, takes a gentle, but effective, approach to pain management. Every patient’s pain and tolerance level is unique, so we strive to determine the cause of the pain and the best possible treatment option. Because we are an interventional pain practice, we take a gentle, but effective approach to treating pain. Our goal is try the least invasive options possible with minimal or no pain medication to provide the best outcome. A return to an enjoyable, productive lifestyle is our ultimate goal for our patients.

Some Common Conditions We Treat Include:  Some Common Treatment Options We Provide Include:
  • Myofacial injections (trigger point injections)
  • Fluoroscopic guided joint injections
  • Epidural steroid injections (neck, back and low back pain)
  • Selective peripheral nerve blocks
  • Sympathetic nerve blocks (neck, back and low back pain)
  • Spinal cord stimulation trials and implants
  • Intrathecal pump (morphine pump) trials and implants
  • Discography
  • Radiofrequency therapy for nerve pain (neck, back and low back pain)

Please see our educational videos and animations for more information on some of our
procedures and common pain conditions treated at Piedmont Interventional Pain Care.


 

Myofascial pain (muscle pain)
A type of chronic pain syndrome, myofascial pain is caused by injury or damage to the soft, connective tissue surrounding the muscles and organs. Myofascial pain creates sensitive areas in the muscles called “trigger points” that can create radiating pain throughout the muscle. While the exact cause of myofascial pain is not completely understood, there are conditions and systemic disorders that may contribute to the syndrome including connective tissue diseases, depression and fibromyalgia. | Back to top |

Cervical facet arthropathy (neck joint pain)
Pain can come from the facet joints of the neck and are often caused by an arthritic condition generalized as cervical facet arthropathy. Facet joints are where the vertebrae (bones in the back) connect. While cervical facet arthropathy may be caused from rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis or other type of degeneration, simple diagnostic tests can be used to help diagnose the condition and define the treatment options. | Back to top |

Cervical degenerative disc disease
Cervical degeneration may be the result of an injury or the natural process of aging. As a person ages, the discs of the vertebrae start to lose their resiliency. With the disc reduced, the “shock absorber” affect is lost resulting in bone and joint inflammation that can cause pain. In the neck area, it is referred to as cervical degenerative disk disease. Cervical degenerative disc disease can cause extreme discomfort, headache and/or pain that radiates down the shoulders and arms. | Back to top |

Neck, shoulder and arm pain
Muscle (myofascial) pain, joint pain (facet, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand), nerve pain (central spinal nerves or peripheral – distal from the spinal column). | Back to top |

Occipital headaches (neuralgia)
An occipital headache (neuralgia) is caused by irritation or injury to the occipital nerve – a nerve running from the top of the top of the vertebrae to the base of the skull. Occipital neuralgia can feel like a migraine-type headache or tension headache, but the cause stems from the inflammation of the nerves just under the skin at the back of the skull. | Back to top |

Thoracic facet arthropathy (back joint pain)
Pain coming from the facet joints in the back is referred to as thoracic facet arthropathy. Facet joints are located where the vertebrae (bones in the back) connect. While thoracic facet arthropathy may be caused from rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis or other type of degeneration, simple diagnostic tests can be used to help diagnose the condition, its causes, and treatment options. | Back to top |

Thoracic degenerative disc disease
Thoracic degeneration may be the result of an injury or the natural process of aging. As a person ages, the discs of the vertebrae start to lose their resiliency. With the disc reduced, the “shock absorber” affect is lost resulting in bone and joint inflammation that can cause pain. In the upper back area, it is referred to as thoracic degenerative disk disease. Thoracic degenerative disc disease can cause extreme discomfort in the back and/or pain that radiates down the hips and legs. | Back to top |

Lumbar facet arthropathy (low back joint pain)
Pain coming from the facet joints in the lower back is referred to as lumbar facet arthropathy. Facet joints are where the vertebrae (bones in the back) connect. While lumbar facet arthropathy may be caused from rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis or other type of degeneration, simple diagnostic tests can be used to help diagnose the condition, its causes, and treatment options. | Back to top |

Lumbar degenerative disc disease
As a person ages, the discs of the vertebrae start to lose their resiliency. With the disc reduced, the “shock absorber” affect is lost resulting in bone and joint inflammation that can cause pain. In the upper back area, it is referred to as thoracic degenerative disk disease. Lumbar degenerative disc disease can cause extreme discomfort in the back and/or pain that radiates down the hips and legs. | Back to top |

Back and leg pain
Muscle (myofascial) pain, joint pain (facet & sacroiliac joint), nerve pain (central spinal nerves or peripheral – distal from the spinal column). | Back to top |

Hip and knee pain
Hip and knee joint pain from inflammation secondary to an arthritic or other inflammatory condition. | Back to top |

Sacroiliac joint pain
Located at the very bottom of the back, the sacroiliac joints are located between the sacrum (the large triangular bone at the base of the spine) and the ilia (hip bones). Typically pain results from an injury causing the joints to become locked or too loose. When this occurs, a host of symptoms can affect the lower back, buttocks, thighs and groin. While he condition may be mistaken for sciatica, sacroiliac joint pain typically is causes by trauma, injury or inflammatory disease in the joints. | Back to top |

Coccygeal (tail bone) pain
Inflammation and pain in the coccyx (tailbone) area is referred to as coccydynia. Pain in this area is usually caused by an injury (bruise/broken bone) involving the coccyx. | Back to top |

Sciatica (radicular pain)
When one of the nerve roots that branches out from the spinal column suffers an injury or impingement, pain, numbness, weakness or other symptoms may be felt in other parts of the body. Ruptured discs, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease and injuries that occur in the lower back may refer pain from the lower back to the lower extremities is referred to as sciatica. This pain can radiate from the back, hips, and legs and down to the foot. | Back to top |

Shingle (herpes zoster) pain
Its clinical term, shingles is the herpes zoster virus (also known as the “chicken pox” virus). More common in the elderly population, shingles may appear when immune defenses are lowered and are unable to keep the virus dormant. The virus replicates and reappears in the patient at the dermatome level (an area of skin that is mainly supplied by a single spinal nerve) across the chest or abdomen and is very painful – even debilitating. | Back to top |

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD)
Complex regional pain syndrome (also known as Reflex sympathetic dystrophy) causes extreme, chronic pain that typically affects one of the arms, legs, hands or feet. Burning, swelling and redness in the affected area(s) may accompany the condition. While the cause is still somewhat a mystery, there is some evidence that it may stem from a breakdown in the central or peripheral nervous system. | Back to top |

Cancer pain
Cancer pain may come from the disease itself or the treatment for the cancer itself. The patient and his or her individual situation define this type of pain. | Back to top |